Beef

Our beef is regionally-raised and arrives at the butcher shop in full sides after dry aging a minimum of fourteen days. We process beef multiple times a week to ensure the freshest products, and we cut steaks to order and strive to use every piece of the beef.

We also receive a variety of roasting and braising meats: top, bottom, eye of round, sirloin tip, chuck, short ribs and shanks. Additionally, we offer great barbecue items from our cows (brisket or Texas-style ribs). Trim from the whole dry-aged cow becomes our ground beef that we grind fresh daily. Bones are also available at the shop for stocks, or customers can grab one of our rich pre-made stocks.

We have access to any beef cut needed; we may just need some time.

Tennessee Grass Fed Beef

Tennessee Grass Fed has been established as a family farm since 1837, but farmer Phil Baggett began the transformation towards grass-fed farming five years ago. TGF’s goal is to heal and improve the land while simultaneously producing wholesome products. They believe the animal protein portion of our diet should come from livestock raised on a natural diet of grass and not a diet containing added hormones or other additives. For beef, this means high-quality grass grown in open pastures. Using effective grazing management practices and the right combination of warm and cool season grasses requires less input of chemical fertilizers and fossil fuels, ensuring healthier grass.

KLD Farm

KLD Farm is located in Ashland City, Tennessee, and focuses on true free-range farming for all of their animals. KLD, which stands for Ken and Lucy Drinnon, has some of the most richly-flavored beef in Tennessee. Their cattle has access to clean water, natural grasses and plenty of hay. Of course, they are never given any hormones, antibiotics or steroids; only love from the Drinnon clan. KLD’s beef is USDA inspected, 100% chemical free and is aged for 14-18 days to enhance the delicious flavor.

Rittenberry Farms

Rittenberry Farms, located in Burna, Kentucky is owned and operated by Joey Rittenberry along with his wife and four kids. Joey is a first generation farmer who spent 20 years cutting timber before he switched over to raising beef in 1993. Currently, the Rittenberry’s have around 1,000 beef on their 5,500 acre farm, as well as hundreds of hogs.

All of the Rittenberry Farms beef have access to pasture, however a portion of the beef are given a diet supplemented with grain, also grown on the property.