Cat’s Externship: Real, Meaty Experience.

Externship: Real, Life Experience.

As graduates of two of the nation’s most renowned culinary institutes, Chris and James both know about the importance of getting an externship during school, and they also know just how pivotal said experience can be in making a future career move.

When Cat Gleason, a current student at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY (James’ alma matter) reached out to inquire about doing her externship at Porter Road Butcher, the two immediately jumped at the opportunity to become a certified and qualified location in the eyes of the CIA.

Cat Gleason | Porter Road ButcherWE have our own extern now!” James said. “How freaking cool is that?! Maybe now we’ll get one every year…”

Don’t get ahead of yourself, pal.

According to Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts’ (Chris’ alma matter) website, “The goal of an externship is to provide students with industry experience. [This] is your opportunity to see how a company achieves [both] profitability and high quality.”

In other words, an externship is a learning opportunity. It’s research. It’s a time to explore all of the possibilities and potentially rule some things out. And it’s also a cool way for the “host” of the extern to give back to their roots.

For Cat, she wanted to learn and research and explore the world of butchering. She’s here for the meat. And we’re psyched to have her.

Unlike an internship, a term that has achieved four-letter-word sentiments in today’s job-hungry crowd, externships in the culinary world often occur in lieu of regular classes during the school year (versus during the summertime or post-graduation) and also provide students with the opportunity to apply the skills that they’ve learned so far to a real world situation. No coffee runs or copy-making here.

Cat began culinary school in December of 2014 and at just 18 years old, decided to drive down to Nashville to expand upon her fundamental knowledge of butchering. “We took a class where we learned about the basics and I really enjoyed that,” she said. “Lots of it was watching the professor break down the primals but we didn’t get too hands on; I want to feel confident about butchering and doing it all myself.”

Throughout her 15-weeks in Nashville, Cat will be working at all of PRB’s locations, switching back and forth between the East Shop and West, as well as taking trips up to PRB Meat Co. in Kentucky where all of our animals are processed. “I’m really excited to go to the slaughterhouse,” she said. “I’m a little nervous to see the animals actually get killed, but I still want to.”

Although Cat claims that she’s not a person who generally likes to have much fun (???), she said she is interested in trying her hands (and feet) at power yoga during her time here, in addition to exploring Nashville’s restaurant scene—don’t try to invite her to a movie though; she doesn’t like them.

We’re excited to have her here on our team, we’re eager to teach her, and we’re thrilled to pass the butchering torch down to an aspiring culinarian.

Welcome, Cat!

Leave a Reply